DEEP SEARCH

  • Clusty — A metasearch engine that combines the results of several top search engines.
  • Intute — A searchable database of trusted sites, reviewed and monitored by subject specialists.
  • INFOMINE — A virtual library of Internet resources relevant to university students and faculty. Built by librarians from the University of California, California State University, the University of Detroit-Mercy, and Wake Forest University.
  • Librarians’ Internet Index — A search engine listing sites deemed trustworthy by actual human librarians, not just a Googlebot.
  • Internet Archive — A database of tens of thousands of movies, live music, audio, texts, and home of the Wayback Machine that allows you to find old versions of web pages, over 55 billion.
  • Direct Search — A list of hundreds of specialty databases and search engines. No longer maintained, but still perhaps the most complete list of the deep web.
  • Archive Grid — Search through thousands of libraries, museums, and archives that have contributed nearly a million collection descriptions to ArchiveGrid.
  • Archives Made Easy — An on-line guide to archives around the globe that includes tips on how to navigate various repositories. Hosted by the International History department at the London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Google Scholar — Search for peer-reviewed papers, theses, books, abstracts and articles, from academic publishers, professional societies, preprint repositories, universities and other scholarly organizations.
  • Infomine — Search for databases, electronic journals, electronic books, bulletin boards, mailing lists, online library card catalogs, articles, directories of researchers, and many other types of information.
  • Intute — A network of UK universities and partners created this free online search service with access to education and research resources.
  • Librarian’s Internet Index — Categorized index to Web sites.
  • Repositories of Primary Sources — The University of Idaho has compiled primary sources by international area. Dig deeper to discover the repository, where you can gain access to primary sources online.
  • World Lecture Hall — Find a lecture – written, video, audio, or course notes. Search by topic or by area. Brought to you by the University of Texas at Austin.
  • Windows Live Academic Search — Search for scholarly journal articles, conference proceedings, dissertations and academic books.
  • Yahoo! Humanities Collection — Search for anything on the Web under the humanities heading.
  • Bartleby — Bartleby contains many classic American and English texts searchable by author, title, and genre.
  • Episteme Links — Search for over 19,000 categorized links to philosophy resources on the Internet.
  • In Other Words — A lexicon for the humanities. Learn the terminology of a new discipline and come to understand the generally accepted reference of terms.
  • Bright Planet estimates the invisible, or deep, web as being 500 times bigger than the searchable, or surface, Web. Considering that Google alone covers around 8 billion pages, that’s just mind boggling.”
  • Spiders meander throughout the Web, indexing the addresses of pages they discover. When these software programs run into a page from the Invisible Web, they don’t know quite what to do with it. These spiders can record the address, but can’t tell you squat about the information the page contains. Why? There’s a lot of factors, but mainly they boil down to technical barriers and/or deliberate decisions on the part of the site owner(s) to exclude their pages from search engine spiders. For instance, university library sites that require passwords to access their information will not be included in search engine results, as well as script-based pages that are not easily read by search engine spiders.”
  • Direct Search put together by Gary Price, a librarian and information research consultant. His page is nicely organized into searchable categories and is updated frequently.
  • Invisible Web Directory put together by the aforementioned Gary Price and search guru Chris Sherman. This site is a directory of searchable databases, organized by subject.
  • Resource Discovery Network has resources mostly from the United Kingdom, and is extremely well-organized and very searchable.
  • InfoMine, an incredible resource that at last count included over 100,000 links and access to hundreds, if not thousands, of databases.
  • Virtual Library is simple and easy to use, with annotated subject links. I especially appreciate the annotations because it helps rule out extraneous search time.
  • ProFusion metasearch engine provides topical deep Web
  • CompletePlanet.com is a directory of “over 70,000+ searchable databases and specialty search engines.”
  • SJSU Academic Gateway is a fabulous resource that enables you to get into not only San Jose public libraries, but the San Jose State University library as well
  • Ask Eric, which provide access to over 3000 educational resources (organized by category)